18-29 Segment 1: Increasing Osteoporosis

RHJ 18-29 A

 

America is an aging country. As a result, an increase in osteoporosis has become a natural complication. Dr. Sundeep Khosla, Professor of Medicine at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, and Dr. Ethel Siris, Director of the Toni Stabile Osteoporosis Center of the Columbia University Medical Center, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, discuss what osteoporosis is and how it can be treated.

Osteoporosis is a bone disease caused by a decrease in bone density, usually resulting from old age or low levels of estrogen during menopause. Medications taken for a variety of other conditions, such as asthma, rheumatoid arthritis, and anorexia nervosa, can also lead to osteoporosis. Hip fractures are most commonly associated with osteoporosis, and the people who suffer them don’t always make a full recovery. With the increased rate of osteoporosis, the societal cost of fractures will continue to increase dramatically over the next few decades, Dr. Khosla says.

A bone density test is available to help determine who may be at risk and reduce the rate of fractures. But, after recent studies found that typical osteoporosis medications put patients at risk of additional issues, like fracturing the femur or osteonecrosis, many patients began shying away from testing or taking the appropriate medicine.  However, many different drugs have been developed to treat osteoporosis, besides the typical ones. As doctors have continued to learn about the medicines and their side effects, they now know how to tailor a prescription to specific patients, for example scheduling extended periods without taking the drug to avoid negative side effects.

Besides encouraging patients to go through testing and not be afraid of the medicine, Dr. Khosla says that taking precautions like educating primary care physicians and patients about the condition could help lower the risk of fractures from osteoporosis. If patients are still hesitant to take medicine, Dr. Siris has one recommendation: don’t fall. By staying in the best physical shape you can and staying mindful and aware throughout the day, individuals can protect themselves from the risk of fractures.

For more information about osteoporosis or about our guests, visit the links below.

Guests:

  • Dr. Sundeep Khosla, Professor of Medicine at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine
  • Dr. Ethel Siris, Director of the Toni Stabile Osteoporosis Center of the Columbia University Medical Center, New York-Presbyterian Hospital

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18-29 Segment 2: PTSD in Kids

RHJ 18-29 B (2)

 

Contrary to popular belief, children can also develop PTSD. While over 5 million adults in the US develop post-traumatic stress disorder every year, children as young as 2 or 3 can also experience this chronic condition. Dr. Michael Scheeringa, Professor of Child Psychiatry and Associate Professor of Clinical Pediatrics at the Tulane University School of Medicine, explains more about PTSD in children.

Many believe that children are too young to remember traumatic experiences leading to PTSD, but by the age of 16, two thirds of all youths in America have been exposed to a life-threatening event. Dr. Scheeringa explains that experiences like being in a motor vehicle accident, witnessing domestic violence, being sexually abused, being attacked by a dog, or experiencing a school shooting or a natural disaster are just some of the ways a child can develop PTSD.

While PTSD is a prevalent condition in children, it is often misdiagnosed or not identified at all for three reasons: avoidance issues, internalized PTSD symptoms, and the general complexity of the condition with as many as 20 different symptoms. Although PTSD is a chronic condition and is seldom fully recovered from, treatment options are available. Dr. Scheeringa recommends evidence-based treatments like cognitive behavior therapy that teaches children new coping techniques and helps them work through the memories of their traumatic experience. While PTSD is a difficult condition to live with, Dr. Scheeringa says that there is also the possibility of post-traumatic growth, where something good can come from overcoming traumatic events.

To learn more about PTSD in children or about our guest, see the links below.

Guest:

  • Dr. Michael Scheeringa, Professor of Child Psychiatry and Associate Professor of Clinical Pediatrics at the Tulane University School of Medicine

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Medical Notes 18-29

 

Medical Notes this week…

Suicide rates are rising sharply across the United States. A new report finds that nearly 45,000 suicides occurred in the U.S. in 2016, more than twice the number of homicides. Experts say suicide is not only a mental health problem but also a public health issue. In the 27 states that use the National Violent Death Reporting System, 54 percent of suicides were by people without a known mental illness.  

Pediatricians are coming down hard on spanking. A survey published in the Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics finds three out of four pediatricians disapprove of spanking. The survey of doctors shows 78 percent of pediatricians thinks spanking never or hardly ever improves children’s behavior. Parents, however, may disagree. a survey in the journal Child Trends shows that 76 percent of men and 65 percent of women think spanking is a necessary form of discipline.  

And finally, is your favorite restaurant playing “mind games” with you? A study published in the Journal of the Academy of Marketing Sciences finds diners who are exposed to loud music order foods that are significantly higher in calories. High volume sounds are proven to impact heart rate and arousal, so louder music ignites excitement, stimulation and stress. That means restaurants can manipulate customers and contribute to their unhealthy eating habits.

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