Coming Up On Radio Health Journal Show 18-31

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Lonely College Students

Studies show that college students are America’s loneliest people—even more so than the elderly—even though they’re surrounded by people and activities. The role of technology is discussed in isolating students, and the role of changing culture toward children and adolescents having a constantly structured schedule with few breaks for downtime or spontaneity. Experts also discuss how parents, schools and students themselves can overcome social isolation.

Trigeminal Neuralgia-Searing Pain in the Face

A searing, stabbing pain on one side of the face can be so severe it’s sometimes called “the suicide disease,” and may evade diagnosis for some time. The cause of trigeminal neuralgia is often a throbbing artery in contact with nerves at the base of the brain, and while treatment can be difficult it is often ultimately successful. Two experts discuss diagnosis and treatment.

18-30 Segment 1: An Unusual Court Challenge to Obamacare

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A number of court cases have challenged the Constitutionality of the Affordable Care Act, and the federal government has always defended the law—until now, and a Federal Court case brought by the State of Texas. With the stakes increased, experts discuss what the government’s reversal means to consumers.

Guests:

  • Dr. Paul Ginsburg, Director, Schaeffer Initiative for Health Policy, University of Southern California and the Brookings Institution
  • Timothy Jost, Emeritus Professor of Law, Washington and Lee University

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18-30 Segment 2: Tick Paralysis

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Summer is tick season, and tick bites are common. However, bites from a couple of types of ticks can produce paralysis and even death if the tick is not removed quickly. An expert discusses.

Guest:

  • Dr. Mark Dworkin, Infectious disease specialist, University of Illinois at Chicago School of public health

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Medical Notes 18-30

 

Medical Notes this week…

If you’ve ever wanted to find out more about your doctor and his license now there’s an app for that. The Medical Board of California is releasing an app called “Med Board CA” for users in the state who will have access to information on their doctors with a click of a button. The medical board says it wants to help California consumers make informed health care decisions and they’re hoping other states will follow suit.

The human body contains billions of bacteria so it may not be surprising to hear that surgical implants, such as knee replacements, can harbor bacteria of their own. A study in the journal APMIS finds that bacteria, fungi or both may colonize surgical implants, including hip replacements and the screws that fix broken bones but not to worry no patients with implants have shown ill effects from infection.  

Doctors have long known that after menopause, obesity leads to a higher risk of breast cancer. But before menopause, it may be the opposite. new research in the journal Jama Oncology shows that younger women with a higher body mass index have a lower breast cancer risk than those who are thinner. Factors such as hormones, growth factors and breast density all play a role in the apparent link between higher BMI and lower cancer risk. So researchers say gaining weight is no way to prevent breast cancer.

Diabetics may soon be able to say goodbye to painful finger pricks, thanks to a new non-invasive blood glucose monitoring that combines radar and artificial intelligence. The device developed at Waterloo University uses high frequency radio waves to detect the amount of glucose in a liquid. Initial tests with volunteers show the device is about 85 percent as accurate as traditional invasive blood analysis.

And finally, if you’re thinking about what foods are good for you, how about a cup of coffee…or four. A new study published in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine followed a large group of people over 10 years and found that coffee drinkers are about 10 to 15 percent less likely to die than non-coffee drinkers. Researchers suspect coffee contains several bioactive compounds with potential beneficial properties. So go ahead, pour yourself another cup.

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Coming Up On Radio Health Journal Show 18-30

RHJlogo with title

 

An Unusual Court Challenge to Obamacare

A number of court cases have challenged the Constitutionality of the Affordable Care Act, and the federal government has always defended the law—until now, and a Federal Court case brought by the State of Texas. With the stakes increased, experts discuss what the government’s reversal means to consumers.

Tick Paralysis

Summer is tick season, and tick bites are common. However, bites from a couple of types of ticks can produce paralysis and even death if the tick is not removed quickly. An expert discusses.

18-29 Segment 1: Increasing Osteoporosis

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America is an aging country. As a result, an increase in osteoporosis has become a natural complication. Dr. Sundeep Khosla, Professor of Medicine at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, and Dr. Ethel Siris, Director of the Toni Stabile Osteoporosis Center of the Columbia University Medical Center, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, discuss what osteoporosis is and how it can be treated.

Osteoporosis is a bone disease caused by a decrease in bone density, usually resulting from old age or low levels of estrogen during menopause. Medications taken for a variety of other conditions, such as asthma, rheumatoid arthritis, and anorexia nervosa, can also lead to osteoporosis. Hip fractures are most commonly associated with osteoporosis, and the people who suffer them don’t always make a full recovery. With the increased rate of osteoporosis, the societal cost of fractures will continue to increase dramatically over the next few decades, Dr. Khosla says.

A bone density test is available to help determine who may be at risk and reduce the rate of fractures. But, after recent studies found that typical osteoporosis medications put patients at risk of additional issues, like fracturing the femur or osteonecrosis, many patients began shying away from testing or taking the appropriate medicine.  However, many different drugs have been developed to treat osteoporosis, besides the typical ones. As doctors have continued to learn about the medicines and their side effects, they now know how to tailor a prescription to specific patients, for example scheduling extended periods without taking the drug to avoid negative side effects.

Besides encouraging patients to go through testing and not be afraid of the medicine, Dr. Khosla says that taking precautions like educating primary care physicians and patients about the condition could help lower the risk of fractures from osteoporosis. If patients are still hesitant to take medicine, Dr. Siris has one recommendation: don’t fall. By staying in the best physical shape you can and staying mindful and aware throughout the day, individuals can protect themselves from the risk of fractures.

For more information about osteoporosis or about our guests, visit the links below.

Guests:

  • Dr. Sundeep Khosla, Professor of Medicine at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine
  • Dr. Ethel Siris, Director of the Toni Stabile Osteoporosis Center of the Columbia University Medical Center, New York-Presbyterian Hospital

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18-29 Segment 2: PTSD in Kids

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Contrary to popular belief, children can also develop PTSD. While over 5 million adults in the US develop post-traumatic stress disorder every year, children as young as 2 or 3 can also experience this chronic condition. Dr. Michael Scheeringa, Professor of Child Psychiatry and Associate Professor of Clinical Pediatrics at the Tulane University School of Medicine, explains more about PTSD in children.

Many believe that children are too young to remember traumatic experiences leading to PTSD, but by the age of 16, two thirds of all youths in America have been exposed to a life-threatening event. Dr. Scheeringa explains that experiences like being in a motor vehicle accident, witnessing domestic violence, being sexually abused, being attacked by a dog, or experiencing a school shooting or a natural disaster are just some of the ways a child can develop PTSD.

While PTSD is a prevalent condition in children, it is often misdiagnosed or not identified at all for three reasons: avoidance issues, internalized PTSD symptoms, and the general complexity of the condition with as many as 20 different symptoms. Although PTSD is a chronic condition and is seldom fully recovered from, treatment options are available. Dr. Scheeringa recommends evidence-based treatments like cognitive behavior therapy that teaches children new coping techniques and helps them work through the memories of their traumatic experience. While PTSD is a difficult condition to live with, Dr. Scheeringa says that there is also the possibility of post-traumatic growth, where something good can come from overcoming traumatic events.

To learn more about PTSD in children or about our guest, see the links below.

Guest:

  • Dr. Michael Scheeringa, Professor of Child Psychiatry and Associate Professor of Clinical Pediatrics at the Tulane University School of Medicine

Links for more information:

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