18-33 Segment 1: Preventing Bullying of Kids with Disabilities

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Many children are bullied, especially in the middle school years, and many parents worry about their kids, especially if the parents have experienced this themselves growing up. But kids with disabilities are about twice as likely to be victims as those without disabilities. Experts discuss the problem and provide specific how-to’s to educate parents and schools to work together to prevent bullying of these children.

Guests:

  • Barb Ziemke, Senior Advocate and Parent Trainer, Pacer Center and National No Bullying Prevention Center, Minneapolis
  • Jan Urbanski, Director of Safe and Humane Schools, Clemson University Institute on Family and Neighborhood Life and Olweus Bullying Prevention Program

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18-33 Segment 2: Baseball Pitchers and Arm Injuries

 

 

Major League Baseball teams spend $1.7 billion annually on pitchers, yet it is an extremely risky investment. Teams haven’t figured out how to prevent all-too-frequent arm injuries, which are now filtering down to children as well. A journalist who investigated the science of pitching injuries explains.

Guests:

  • Jeff Passan, baseball columnist, Yahoo Sport and author, The Arm: Inside the Billion Dollar Mystery of the Most Valuable Commodity in Sports

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Medical Notes 18-33

 

Medical Notes this week…

We recently reported on children who experience severe stress and how they are more likely to develop psychiatric disorders in adulthood but how does one lead to the other? According to a new study from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, childhood stress changes our genes. Researchers compared the whole genomes of girls with stressful childhoods against girls with relatively calm childhoods and found a difference in gene expression in more than 1,400 genes as a result of the amount of stress the girls had experienced.

Artificially sweetened drinks have a reputation of being bad for your health but for patients with colon cancer they may be a healthy choice, according to a study in the journal PLOS One. Researchers found that among patients who’d already been treated for colon cancer, those who drank at least one can of artificially sweetened beverage per day had a 46 percent decline in risk of cancer recurrence or death.

Students won’t do better in school by taking unprescribed ADHD drugs. These so-called study drugs may make you feel smarter… but a study in the journal Pharmacy finds they don’t actually improve test performance. Researchers say a standard dose of Adderall will improve attention and focus but that doesn’t help on tasks involving short-term memory, reading comprehension, and fluency.

And finally dogs are known to be man’s best friend and a new study shows that over thousands of years, dogs have become very good at reading our social cues. A study in the journal Learning & Behavior shows that not only can dogs sense what their owners are feeling they’ll go through barriers to help their owners. Researchers say that when dogs heard their owner crying in another room, they hurried to push through the door to comfort them.

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18-32 Segment 1: Addiction, Relapse and Criminalization

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After criminal convictions, many people with substance use disorder are placed on probation with the condition they remain completely drug-free. They are often jailed when they relapse, setting back recovery and removing them from treatment that helps keep them clean. Is that fair, when relapse is a common symptom of their disease (and many others)? Addiction and legal experts discuss.

Guests:

  • Lisa Newman-Polk, attorney and social worker, Ayer, MA
  • Michael Botticelli, Executive Director, Grayken Center for Addiction, Boston Medical Center and former Director, National Drug Control Policy
  • Dr. Barbara Herbert, Immediate Past President, Massachusetts Society of Addiction Medicine
  • Dr. Sally Satel, addiction psychiatrist and Lecturer, Yale University School of Medicine and Resident Scholar, American Enterprise Institute

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18-32 Segment 2: Miscommunication and Personality Type

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People have different ways to interpret the world around them, and miscommunication is often a result when we assume we see the world similarly. A noted author discusses an innovative way to classify communication styles to avoid clashes.

Guests:

  • Scott Schwefel, author, Discover Yourself

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Medical Notes 18-32

 

Medical Notes this week…

Colonoscopies might cause more complications than we thought. A new study in the journal “Gut” shows that colonoscopies and upper GI endoscopies performed at outpatient specialty centers cause bacterial infections at a much higher rate than expected. Experts had thought that post-endoscopic infection rates with bacteria such as E. coli were one in a million. The new study shows the rate of infection is actually closer to one in a thousand. but experts say colonoscopies are still a good idea, the best bet to detect and even prevent colon cancer.

A glass of wine for dinner may increase a woman’s chance of developing PMS and several glasses each day may increase it by quite a bit. A study in the journal “BMJ” shows that women who drink alcohol at all are at a 45 percent higher risk of pre-menstrual syndrome, and those who consume more than one drink a day have a 79 percent higher risk. Overall, scientists say alcohol may be responsible for about one in 10 cases of pms.

And finally, if you think the day ahead is going to be stressful your mind and body will be stressed all day long, even if the actual stresses never come. A study in the “Journals of Gerontology: Psychological Sciences” shows that waking up anticipating a bad day impacts working memory, which helps people learn and retain information even when they’re distracted. Researchers say that can lead to a self-fulfilling prophecy—a bad day of mistakes at work or even while driving.

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Coming Up On Radio Health Journal Show 18-32

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Addiction, Relapse, and Criminalization

After criminal convictions, many people with substance use disorder are placed on probation with the condition they remain completely drug free. They are often jailed when they relapse, setting back recovery and removing them from treatment that helps keep them clean. Is that fair, when relapse is a common symptom of their disease (and many others)? Addiction and and legal experts discuss.

Miscommunication and Personality Type

People have different ways to interpret the world around them, and miscommunication is often a result when we assume we see the world similarly. A noted author discusses an innovative way to classify communication styles to avoid clashes.