18-43 Segment 2: Narcolepsy and Cataplexy

RHJ 18-43B wordpress

Sleep disorders can be difficult to diagnose and treat. A science journalist discusses his efforts to overcome narcolepsy, which produces extreme daytime sleepiness, and cataplexy, which produces instant sleep-like paralysis, as well as the science behind sleep disorders.

Guests:

  • Henry Nicholls, author, Sleepyhead: The Neuroscience of a Good Night’s Sleep

Links for more information:

Stay in the loop! Follow us on Twitter and like us on Facebook! Subscribe and review on iTunes!

Medical Notes 18-43


Medical Notes this week…

Nearly 25 million adults and children in the United States have been diagnosed with hay fever… and millions more probably have it without being diagnosed. But a study in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology shows that a hay fever vaccine developed for mice not only works… it works quickly. Human vaccines for some forms of human allergy already exist, including hay fever, but they take three to five years to be effective. Scientists hope the new vaccine in development may change how people approach allergy season.

Egg freezing has become almost common among upwardly mobile young women, but a new study finds that holding off kids for work doesn’t have much to do with it. Rather, the study presented to the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology shows that a much higher proportion of women are freezing their eggs because they haven’t found a man they want to have a family with.

And finally… here’s more evidence that there really may be such a thing as junk food addiction. A study in the journal Appetite shows that people who quit eating junk food suffer withdrawal symptoms that are remarkably like someone stopping drug use. Researchers say symptoms like sadness, irritability, and cravings peaked in the first two to five days after quitting junk food… and then tapered off.

Stay in the loop! Follow us on Twitter and like us on Facebook! Subscribe and review on iTunes!

18-42 Segment 1: Doctors’ Obesity Bias

RHJ 18-42A wordpress

Studies show that medical professionals are as biased as the rest of us against people who are overweight, resulting in lectures, misdiagnoses, and patients who start avoiding the doctor. Experts explain the problem, results, and what might be done about it.

Guests:

    • Dr. Rebecca Puhl, Professor of Human Development and Family Studies, University of Connecticut and Deputy Director, Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity
    • Dr. David Katz, Director, Yale-Griffin Prevention Research Center, Yale University and Founder, True Health Initiative
    • Kathy Kater, psychotherapist specializing in body image, eating and weight issues

Links for more information:

Stay in the loop! Follow us on Twitter and like us on Facebook! Subscribe and review on iTunes!

18-42 Segment 2: Getting Rid of Those Old Style Hospital Gowns

RHJ 18-42B wordpress

Surveys show that hospital gowns are one of the things that most makes a hospital stay unpleasant. Finally hospitals may be moving to get rid of the old style gowns toward a less revealing, more dignified design that is still functional for healthcare workers. Experts discuss.

Guests:

  • Chat Razdan, co-founder and CEO, Care+Wear garment maker
  • Dr. Deborah Mullen, Associate Professor of Health Care Administration, University of Tennessee-Chattanooga and consultant, Health Partners-Park Nicollet Health System

Links for more information:

Stay in the loop! Follow us on Twitter and like us on Facebook! Subscribe and review on iTunes!

Medical Notes 18-42


Medical Notes this week…

Doctors have known that periodontal disease is connected to heart disease…but now there’s evidence that gum disease may kickstart Alzheimer’s disease as well. A study in the journal PLOS One shows that long-term exposure to periodontal disease bacteria results in inflammation and degeneration of brain neurons, at least in mice. Scientists also found periodontal bacteria DNA in the brains of mice who were infected. Researchers admit the results surprised them.

Nearly half of Americans spend most of the workday sitting… and some people have installed treadmill desks to keep moving while they work. Treadmill desks usually have a pace of only one or two miles per hours, but a new study says “not so fast.” The study in the journal PLOS One finds that people using treadmill desks have a less efficient working memory… although other types of thinking are the same whether sitting, standing, or walking.

And finally… scientists in India have uncovered a major public health threat—taking selfies. A study in the Journal of Family Medicine and Primary Care shows that worldwide, more than 250 people have died while taking selfies since 2012. The problem, researchers say, is that people go too far seeking a perfect shot… and end up drowning, falling off a cliff, or being hit by a train.

Stay in the loop! Follow us on Twitter and like us on Facebook! Subscribe and review on iTunes!

18-41 Segment 1: Dementia in Women

RHJ 18-41A wordpress

About two-thirds of people with dementia in the United States are women, and researchers are discovering it’s not just because they live longer. Reproductive history also plays a role. Scientists are focusing on the role of estrogen as a potential protective factor against Alzheimer’s disease. Several who are involved in this research explain.

Guests:

    • Dr. Rachel Whitmer, Professor of Epidemiology, University of California-Davis
    • Dr. Heather Snyder, Senior Director, Medical and Scientific Operations, Alzheimer’s Association
    • Dr. Pauline Maki, Professor of Psychiatry and Psychology, University of Illinois-Chicago

Links for more information:

Stay in the loop! Follow us on Twitter and like us on Facebook! Subscribe and review on iTunes!

18-41 Segment 2: Homesickness

RHJ 18-41B wordpress

What we now call “homesickness” used to be a medical diagnosis called “nostalgia,” and it was considered life-threatening. Today many people consider homesickness to be a childish emotion, but an expert says it’s nothing to be ashamed of. We all suffer from it sometime and need to know how to cope.

Guests:

  • Dr. Susan Matt, Professor of History, Weber State University
  • Dr. Chris Willard, Lecturer in Psychology, Harvard Medical School

Links for more information:

Stay in the loop! Follow us on Twitter and like us on Facebook! Subscribe and review on iTunes!