19-15 Segment 1: The Miracle of Transplants

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Organ transplantation has dramatically changed lives and is raising hopes it could do even more for millions of people. But getting where we are has not been easy. A transplant surgeon traces the history of transplant research and notes the courage to fail among pioneering researchers and patients.

Guest:

  • Dr. Josh Mezrich, Associate Professor of Surgery, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, and author, When Death Becomes Life: Notes From a Transplant Surgeon

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19-14 Segment 1: Examining “Medicare For All”

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Two Congressional plans, one from each side of the political spectrum, are competing to blow up the current healthcare system. Here experts examine one of them—the left’s bid to replace private insurers with a government-run single-payer plan labeled “Medicare for All.” Alternatives may include bolstering the Affordable Care Act, or getting rid of it completely.

Guests:

  • Dr. Paul Ginsburg, Director, USC-Brookings Schaeffer Initiative for Health Policy
  • Deborah Burger, RN, President, National Nurses United
  • Dr. Ken Thorpe, Professor of Health Policy, Emory University
  • Lauren Crawford Shaver, Executive Director, Partnership for America’s Health Care Future

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19-14 Segment 2: Symptom Searching on the Internet

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One of the most popular searches on Google is for symptoms and what they mean. It’s created a much more well informed patient population, but one that may panic at the least pain or discomfort. Two experts discuss how to think of symptoms and how to search for them.

Guests:

  • Dr. Mark Eisenberg, Associate Professor of Medicine, Columbia University, co-author, Am I Dying: A Complete Guide to Your Symptoms and What to Do Next
  • Dr. Christopher Kelly, Senior Clinical Fellow, Columbia University, co-author, Am I Dying: A Complete Guide to Your Symptoms and What to Do Next

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19-09 Segment 1: Silent Heart Attack

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Heart attacks that produce few if any symptoms may be mistaken for indigestion or simple malaise, but they can be more serious than heart attacks that bring crushing pain because they often don’t bring a victim to the hospital for lifesaving help. Experts discuss.

Guests:

  • Dr. Martha Gulati, cardiologist, University of Arizona and Editor-in-Chief, American College of Cardiology patient education initiative
  • Dr. Robert Vogel, Professor of Medicine and Cardiology, University of Colorado and co-author, The Pritikin Edge

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19-09 Segment 2: When Chronically Ill Kids Grow Up

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Children with serious chronic diseases often have a tough time transitioning from pediatric care, which has much support built in, to adult care, which has to be managed by the patient. Experts discuss how parents can make it easier with a gradual transition.

Guests:

  • Dr. Maria Ferris, pediatric nephrologist and Associate Professor of Pediatrics and Medicine, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill
  • Dr. Miranda van Tilburg, gastroenterologist, hematologist and Associate Professor of Medicine, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill

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Medical Notes 19-08

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Medical Notes this week…

Explorers and scientists have been looking for the fountain of youth for thousands of years. Now there’s speculation they may have found an aging inhibitor in a generic HIV drug called Lamivudine. A study in the journal Nature shows that mice who are equivalent to 75 years old in human terms experienced dramatically reduced inflammation and other signs of aging when they received the drug. Lamivudine was approved for treating HIV in 1995. Scientists say they’re anxious to start human anti-aging trials.

Speed limits on highways are usually set as a result of engineering studies. But some local governments override those recommendations, believing that the lower the limit is, the safer the road will be. A new study in the journal Accident Analysis and Prevention shows that’s only partially true. Crashes are reduced when a speed limit is set five miles per hour lower than recommendations… but setting the speed limit 10, 15, or 25 miles per hour lower actually increases both total crashes and fatal crashes because so many drivers completely ignore the limit.

And finally… educators have long sought ways to get girls more interested in science. Now a study in the journal Psychological Science has some tips. The study shows that suggesting “let’s do science” is much more effective at getting girls engaged than suggesting “let’s be scientists.” Researchers say pervasive stereotypes, even among the young, torpedo the idea that very many girls ever do become scientists.

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19-06 Segment 1: Xenotransplantation—Organ From Other Species

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After attempts to use non-human primates as a source of scarce organs for transplant, doctors have turned to pigs for a variety of reasons. They’re now making great progress against the largest hurdle—rejection. One of the world’s foremost xenotransplantation experts discusses how the process might work and what the future might look like for millions of potential organ and tissue recipients.

Guest:

  • Dr. David Cooper, Professor of Surgery, University of Alabama at Birmingham and Co-Director, UAB Xenotransplantation Program

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