Medical Notes 18-45


Medical Notes this week…

Acute myeloid leukemia, or AML is one of the deadliest cancers, with a five-year survival rate of about 25 percent… and even when a patient has a lasting remission, the disease almost always relapses. But a new study in the journal Nature Communications finds that the disease appears to be the fault of a single gene, which they’ve located. Researchers say the gene rewires the body’s entire set of blood-forming cells and tissues. They hope the breakthrough could eventually lead to a gene-targeted therapy and improve survival rates.

Scientists have discovered some of the reasons why people with obesity have a higher risk of asthma. A study in the Journal of Physiology—Lung Cellular and Molecular Physiology shows that inflammation in airways is greater in people with obesity. Those with obesity are also more likely to over-respond to allergens in airway muscles…causing the airways to narrow. Researchers say the discoveries may improve asthma treatment.

Teachers often contribute to a diagnosis of attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder in children… but a new study concludes they may be mistaking immaturity for ADHD. The study in the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry shows that it’s most often the youngest kids in a classroom who are diagnosed with ADHD. Experts also say that in children who are diagnosed… it appears that some parts of the brain mature up to three years later than in kids who are not labeled.

And finally… one good way to get the vitamins you need in the future may be to chew some gum. A study in the Journal of Functional Foods shows that gum loaded with vitamins delivers enough of them to significantly raise levels in the blood. Both water-soluble and fat-soluble vitamins were effectively delivered in gum… and researchers say most people think it’s a pleasant way to get nutrition.

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18-40 Segment 2: Polyamines

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Researchers have discovered a variety of components in foods that are essential to health but are low in quantity in most diets. One of these is a set of compounds called polyamines. Researchers explain what they are, how they work, and how people can replace those that are needed in the diet.

Guests:

  • Rick Bendera, President and CEO, Nokomis Research
  • Dr. Brazos Minshew, Naturopath, Austin TX

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17-45 Segment 1: More Carbon Dioxide, Less Nutritious Food Crops

 

Rising levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere are making crops grow bigger & faster. However, researchers have found that these crops contain significantly lower levels of protein, iron, zinc, and other important nutrients, potentially endangering nutrition for hundreds of millions of people. Experts explain the effect will get worse as CO2 levels continue to rise, and what might be done to combat the problem.

Guest:

  • Dr. Sam Myers, Principal Research Scientist and Director, Planetary Health Alliance, Harvard University
  • Dr. Kristie Ebi, Director, Center for Health and the Global Environment, Univ. of Washington

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17-38 Segment 2: Do Cardiologists Know Nutrition?

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If medical experts aren’t sure which foods are healthy, how do we decide what to eat? Dr. Charles Katzenberg, a cardiologist at the Sarver Heart Center, says he has discussions about heart healthy food every day with his patients. There is not a national consensus on heart healthy food. This means that different people will give different answers, and no one seems to know what to do. Most cardiologists agree that a good diet will help a person. While the same cardiologists admit to having minimal or no training at all on nutrition in medical school or at their residencies.

Dr. Stephen Devries of the Gaples Institute says while some nutritional knowledge is common sense, other information needs to be taught. If medical professionals aren’t properly trained, they won’t be able to suggest effective interventions. Why is nutrition not taught to a cardiologist? According to Dr. Katzenberg, nutrition isn’t taught to cardiologists, because their training programs prioritize other information.. Both experts agree that the issue starts with the system not putting enough emphasis on preventative measures. The key to solving this problem is for medical professionals to work together with other specialists, like nutritionists, who might have relevant training that would benefit the patient.

Guest:

  • Dr. Charles Katzenberg, University of Arizona Sarver Heart Center
  • Dr. Stephen Devries, Executive Director, Gaples Institute for Integrative Cardiology

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Coming Up On Radio Health Journal Show 17-38

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Cutting Nicotine in Cigarettes

The FDA has proposed mandating a significant cut in the nicotine content of cigarettes to encourage them to move to healthier forms of nicotine distribution, such as e-cigarettes. Experts explain how the plan might work and the science behind it.

Do Cardiologists Know Nutrition?

A healthy diet is one of the best weapons against heart disease and its recurrence, yet new studies show cardiologists (as well as other physicians) are woefully deficient in nutritional knowledge. Experts discuss causes and outcomes of this lack of knowledge.

16-06 Segment 2: Double Dipping and the Five Second Rule

 

Synopsis: Super Bowl party snacks are prime territory for contamination via cross contamination and being dropped on the floor. A scientist who has studied both phenomena discusses the truth (or lack of truth) in two old myths.

Host: Nancy Benson. Guest: Dr. Paul Dawson, Professor of Food, Nutrition and Packaging Science, Clemson University

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16-05 Segment 2: Harmful Inflammation

 

Synopsis: Low-level systemic inflammation is being tied to many disorders including heart disease, and now research has even tied inflammation to intermittent explosive disorder, a syndrome of repeated rage. Experts discuss these findings and how inflammation can be combatted through diet and supplementation.

Host: Nancy Benson. Guests: Dr. Melina Jampolis, nutrition specialist physician and author, The Calendar Diet; Dr. Emil Coccaro, Professor and Chairman of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neuroscience, University of Chicago.

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Click here for the transcript