18-32 Segment 1: Addiction, Relapse and Criminalization

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After criminal convictions, many people with substance use disorder are placed on probation with the condition they remain completely drug-free. They are often jailed when they relapse, setting back recovery and removing them from treatment that helps keep them clean. Is that fair, when relapse is a common symptom of their disease (and many others)? Addiction and legal experts discuss.

Guests:

  • Lisa Newman-Polk, attorney and social worker, Ayer, MA
  • Michael Botticelli, Executive Director, Grayken Center for Addiction, Boston Medical Center and former Director, National Drug Control Policy
  • Dr. Barbara Herbert, Immediate Past President, Massachusetts Society of Addiction Medicine
  • Dr. Sally Satel, addiction psychiatrist and Lecturer, Yale University School of Medicine and Resident Scholar, American Enterprise Institute

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18-32 Segment 2: Miscommunication and Personality Type

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People have different ways to interpret the world around them, and miscommunication is often a result when we assume we see the world similarly. A noted author discusses an innovative way to classify communication styles to avoid clashes.

Guests:

  • Scott Schwefel, author, Discover Yourself

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Medical Notes 18-32

 

Medical Notes this week…

Colonoscopies might cause more complications than we thought. A new study in the journal “Gut” shows that colonoscopies and upper GI endoscopies performed at outpatient specialty centers cause bacterial infections at a much higher rate than expected. Experts had thought that post-endoscopic infection rates with bacteria such as E. coli were one in a million. The new study shows the rate of infection is actually closer to one in a thousand. but experts say colonoscopies are still a good idea, the best bet to detect and even prevent colon cancer.

A glass of wine for dinner may increase a woman’s chance of developing PMS and several glasses each day may increase it by quite a bit. A study in the journal “BMJ” shows that women who drink alcohol at all are at a 45 percent higher risk of pre-menstrual syndrome, and those who consume more than one drink a day have a 79 percent higher risk. Overall, scientists say alcohol may be responsible for about one in 10 cases of pms.

And finally, if you think the day ahead is going to be stressful your mind and body will be stressed all day long, even if the actual stresses never come. A study in the “Journals of Gerontology: Psychological Sciences” shows that waking up anticipating a bad day impacts working memory, which helps people learn and retain information even when they’re distracted. Researchers say that can lead to a self-fulfilling prophecy—a bad day of mistakes at work or even while driving.

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Coming Up On Radio Health Journal Show 18-32

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Addiction, Relapse, and Criminalization

After criminal convictions, many people with substance use disorder are placed on probation with the condition they remain completely drug free. They are often jailed when they relapse, setting back recovery and removing them from treatment that helps keep them clean. Is that fair, when relapse is a common symptom of their disease (and many others)? Addiction and and legal experts discuss.

Miscommunication and Personality Type

People have different ways to interpret the world around them, and miscommunication is often a result when we assume we see the world similarly. A noted author discusses an innovative way to classify communication styles to avoid clashes.

18-31 Segment 1: Lonely College Students

 

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Studies show that college students are America’s loneliest people—even more so than the elderly—even though they’re surrounded by people and activities. The role of technology is discussed in isolating students, and the role of changing culture toward children and adolescents having a constantly structured schedule with few breaks for downtime or spontaneity. Experts also discuss how parents, schools and students themselves can overcome social isolation.

Guests:

  • Rachel Simmons, Leadership Development Specialist, Smith College
  • Dr.  Victor Schwartz, Chief Medical Officer, JED Foundation
  • Dr. Julianne Holt-Lunstad, Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience, Brigham Young University

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18-31 Segment 2: Trigeminal Neuralgia-Searing Pain in the Face

trigeminal neuralgia

 

A searing, stabbing pain on one side of the face can be so severe it’s sometimes called “the suicide disease,” and may evade diagnosis for some time. The cause of trigeminal neuralgia is often a throbbing artery in contact with nerves at the base of the brain, and while treatment can be difficult it is often ultimately successful. Two experts discuss diagnosis and treatment.  

Guests:

  • Dr. Mark McLaughlin, Princeton Brain and Spine, Princeton, NJ
  • Dr. Jeffrey Brown, neurosurgeon, NYU Winthrop Hospital and Director of Medical Board, TNA Facial Pain Organization

Links for more information:

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Coming Up On Radio Health Journal Show 18-31

RHJlogo with title

 

Lonely College Students

Studies show that college students are America’s loneliest people—even more so than the elderly—even though they’re surrounded by people and activities. The role of technology is discussed in isolating students, and the role of changing culture toward children and adolescents having a constantly structured schedule with few breaks for downtime or spontaneity. Experts also discuss how parents, schools and students themselves can overcome social isolation.

Trigeminal Neuralgia-Searing Pain in the Face

A searing, stabbing pain on one side of the face can be so severe it’s sometimes called “the suicide disease,” and may evade diagnosis for some time. The cause of trigeminal neuralgia is often a throbbing artery in contact with nerves at the base of the brain, and while treatment can be difficult it is often ultimately successful. Two experts discuss diagnosis and treatment.