19-11 Segment 1: Recruiting Patients for Cancer Clinical Trials

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Clinical trials drive medical advancement, but cancer clinical trials seldom meet their goals in recruiting patients. Experts discuss causes, consequences, and actions being taken to meet needs.

Guests:

  • Dr. David Ahern, Director, Program in Behavioral Informatics and EHealth, Brigham & Women’s Hospital, Assistant Professor of Psychology, Harvard Medical School, and co-author, Oncology Informatics: Using Health Information Technology to Improve Processes and Outcomes in Cancer
  • Dr. Bradford Hesse, Chief of HealthCommunication Informatics, National Cancer Institute, and co-author, Oncology Informatics: Using Health Information Technology to Improve Processes and Outcomes in Cancer
  • Dr. Julie Brahmer, Co-Director, Upper Aerodigestive Department, Bloomberg~Kimmel Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy, and Professor of Oncology and Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

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19-07 Segment 2: When Does Genetic Engineering Go Too Far?

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Advancements in genetic science are often clouded in ethical controversy. Often, scientists are accused of “playing God.” Experts discuss a new platform where scientists and public can debate it, and from which education can be disseminated.

Guest:

  • Dr. Ting Wu, Professor of Genetics, Harvard Medical School

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19-06 Segment 2: What Determines Our Food Preferences

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Scientists are discovering that our food preferences are much more than a matter of taste, and that taste itself is more complicated than we thought. Psychology also plays a role. An expert discusses what determines preferences, such as why some people like jalapeno peppers & black coffee, and some don’t.

Guest:

  • Dr. Rachel Herz, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Brown University, and author, Why You Eat What You Eat: The Science Behind Our Relationship With Food

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18-52 Segment 1: Smart Roads

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In the near future, cars will be able to provide data as well as receive it, and a variety of methods are being researched to tap into this. Experts explain how cars can communicate with roads, traffic signals and central computers, and how roads themselves may collect data on the cars they carry. In the future, autonomous cars may use these links to greatly speed travel and make it much safer.

Guests:

  • Andrew Bremer, Managing Director of Local Affairs, Drive Ohio
  • Tim Sylvester, Founder and CEO, Integrated Roadways Co.

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18-26 Segment 1: The “Other” Side of Military Science

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Military science involves more than developing bullets and bombs. In fact, some of the biggest adversaries that our soldiers face are everyday challenges, like exhaustion, heat, and noise, to which solutions must be as meticulously developed as with weaponry. Mary Roach, author of Grunt: The Curious Science of Humans at War, explains more about her look into the unexpected side of military research.

Roach explored the multitude of products developed for military personnel, which seek to solve problems ranging from excessive sweat to hearing loss and everything in between. She found that military science is constantly developing, because as we make one improvement, the enemy adjusts, leading to yet another improvement, and so the cycle continues. Every uniform is tailored to the soldier’s needs, and everything they wear, carry, and even eat has been designed to be practical, as well as lightweight and comfortable. Many different technologies must work harmoniously and be weighed with the needs of the soldiers.

While her book covers several fascinating military developments, one of the most important is the technology military scientists have developed to prevent hearing loss — the number one expenditure for the Veteran Affairs Department when the soldiers return. While earplugs are effective in dampening noise, they also hinder communication.  So, scientists have developed the Tactical Communication and Protection System, which quiets loud noise and amplifies quiet noise.

To learn more about military science or to purchase a copy of Roach’s book, visit the links below.

Guest:

  • Mary Roach, author of Grunt: The Curious Science of Humans at War

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18-08 Segment 2: A Real-Life Star Trek Tricorder

Copyright: sudok1 / 123RF Stock Photo

 

Most people have seen sci-fi shows and films like Star Wars and Star Trek, and been amused by the imagined technology used by these beings. Dr. Basil Harris, emergency physician at Lankenau Medical Center and founder of Final Frontier Medical Devices, took this inspiration one step further by actually creating one of these devices. His machine called DxtER is similar to the Tricorder from Star Trek; it is a non-invasive remote medical diagnostic technology.

With this device, patients are given a whole new way to measure their health. Part of the appeal of DxtER is the non-invasiveness of the technology. Dr. Basil explains that the iPad based technology is packed with sensors that can measure vitals in the body, like blood pressure, without having to use a cuff or other external objects to test the patient. Not only is the device capable of picking up on vitals, it can also provide the user with a diagnosis based off of their symptoms. It uses artificial intelligence in order to incorporate the doctor into the system.

However, Dr. Harris does not believe that the device calls for the elimination of doctors entirely. He explains that DxtER was created as a tool that can help people work with their providers more efficiently. But before this device can be made common in household first aid kits, it must be FDA approved which Dr. Harris expects to be a slow process that could take from five to ten years. With many emerging technologies in healthcare, devices like DxtER must work to gain the trust of the public.

Guests:

  • Dr. Basil Harris, emergency physician at Lankenau Medical Center and founder of Final Frontier Medical Devices

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18-03 Segment 1: When Should Kids Get a Phone?

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Smartphones have become ubiquitous among those in their teens and older, but there is no consensus on when children should first get a phone. Experts discuss dangers and cautions, and how parents can decide when the time is right for their kids to “get connected.”

Guests:

  • Dr. Yalda Uhls, Assistant Professor of Psychology, UCLA and author, Media Moms and Digital Dads
  • Dr. Richard Freed, child and adolescent psychologist and author, Wired Child: Reclaiming Childhood in a Digital Age
  • Brooke Shannon, founder, Wait Until 8th
  • Dr. Scott Campbell, Professor of Telecommunications, University of Michigan

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