19-04 Segment 1: Rethinking Antibiotics

rhj 19-04a wordpress

Since the introduction of antibiotics in World War II, doctors have prescribed courses of treatment that typically ran longer than necessary. Bacterial resistance is forcing a reevaluation, shortening courses sometimes to just a few days and even prompting doctors to advise not using all pills if patients feel better.

Guests:

  • Dr. Brad Spellberg, Chief Medical Officer, Los Angeles County-University of Southern California Medical Center
  • Dr. William Schaffner, infectious disease specialist, Vanderbilt University Medical Center
  • Dr. Louis Rice, Chairman, Department of Medicine, Warren Alpert Medical School, Brown University

Links for more information:

Stay in the loop! Follow us on Twitter and like us on Facebook! Subscribe and review on iTunes!

19-04 Segment 2: The Early Days of Hormones

rhj 19-04b wordpress

Hormones were unknown until a little more than 100 years ago, and experts admit we still have a lot to learn. An expert author details the discovery of hormones and how our growing knowledge has shaped treatment of many diseases and conditions.

Guest:

  • Dr. Randi Hutter Epstein, Yale University, Columbia University, and author, Aroused: The History of Hormones and How They Control Just About Everything

Links for more information:

Stay in the loop! Follow us on Twitter and like us on Facebook! Subscribe and review on iTunes!

15-44 Segment 1: Preventing Misdiagnoses

 

Synopsis: Studies estimate that about five percent of diagnoses are wrong, leading treatment down the wrong road. Experts discuss why misdiagnoses occur, and a new Institute of Medicine report on how they might be prevented.

Host: Reed Pence. Guests: Dr. Mark L. Graber, President, Society to Improve Diagnosis in Medicine and Senior Fellow, RTI International; Dr. Lewis Levy, Senior Vice President of Medical Affairs and Chief Quality Officer, Best Doctors; Helen Haskell, President, Mothers Against Medical Error

Links for more information:

Click here for the transcript