19-09 Segment 1: Silent Heart Attack

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Heart attacks that produce few if any symptoms may be mistaken for indigestion or simple malaise, but they can be more serious than heart attacks that bring crushing pain because they often don’t bring a victim to the hospital for lifesaving help. Experts discuss.

Guests:

  • Dr. Martha Gulati, cardiologist, University of Arizona and Editor-in-Chief, American College of Cardiology patient education initiative
  • Dr. Robert Vogel, Professor of Medicine and Cardiology, University of Colorado and co-author, The Pritikin Edge

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18-37 Segment 1: The Coming “Hothouse Earth”

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Rising global temperatures have produced effects such as extreme weather and a rising sea level. Climate scientists fear that if temperatures continue to rise, we may soon reach the point of no return. If the earth’s natural cooling systems start to fail, each could feed failure of the next, resulting in a hothouse with large portions of the planet uninhabitable. Authors of a major report on this phenomenon explain.

Guests:

  • Dr. Diana Liverman, Professor of Geography and Development, University of Arizona
  • Dr. Katherine Richardson, Professor of Biological Oceanography and leader, Sustainability Science Center, Univerity of Copenhagen
  • Dr. Kristina Dahl, Senior Climate Specialist, Union of Concerned Scientists

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17-38 Segment 2: Do Cardiologists Know Nutrition?

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If medical experts aren’t sure which foods are healthy, how do we decide what to eat? Dr. Charles Katzenberg, a cardiologist at the Sarver Heart Center, says he has discussions about heart healthy food every day with his patients. There is not a national consensus on heart healthy food. This means that different people will give different answers, and no one seems to know what to do. Most cardiologists agree that a good diet will help a person. While the same cardiologists admit to having minimal or no training at all on nutrition in medical school or at their residencies.

Dr. Stephen Devries of the Gaples Institute says while some nutritional knowledge is common sense, other information needs to be taught. If medical professionals aren’t properly trained, they won’t be able to suggest effective interventions. Why is nutrition not taught to a cardiologist? According to Dr. Katzenberg, nutrition isn’t taught to cardiologists, because their training programs prioritize other information.. Both experts agree that the issue starts with the system not putting enough emphasis on preventative measures. The key to solving this problem is for medical professionals to work together with other specialists, like nutritionists, who might have relevant training that would benefit the patient.

Guest:

  • Dr. Charles Katzenberg, University of Arizona Sarver Heart Center
  • Dr. Stephen Devries, Executive Director, Gaples Institute for Integrative Cardiology

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17-34 Segment 1: Rural Hospitals in Trouble

 

Approximately 14% of Americans live in a rural area and require access to local hospitals, but many rural hospitals struggle to keep their doors open, citing such financial pressures as the upkeep of equipment and technology.

Dr. Carrie Henning-Smith, a Research Associate at the University of Minnesota, says rural hospitals rely on government funding from programs like Medicare and Medicaid, however neither program cannot fully support the upkeep of buildings and the care of the patients. Although Medicare and Medicaid provide funding, 40% of rural hospitals still operate with a large loss.

Michael Topchik, Director of the Chartis Center for Rural Health, projects that if the current administration cuts Medicaid funding, 15 million recipients will lose health benefits. In addition, Medicaid cuts will drastically affect rural hospitals. Eighty rural hospitals have closed since 2010, and many more could be at risk in the years to come. Closing these rural hospitals would lead to a loss of 35,000 jobs and a $4 billion drag on domestic product. In addition, the residents of rural areas would have to travel long distances to get access to basic health care when they might need it most.

Guests:

  • Dr. Carrie Henning-Smith, Research Associate, University of Minnesota Rural Health Research Center

  • Michael Topchik, Director, Chartis Center for Rural Health

  • Dr. Daniel Derksen, Director, University of Arizona Center for Rural Health

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17-05 Segment 2: Power Naps at Work

Tired Office Woman napping at her Worktable, Leaning her Back on a Chair with Hands at the Back of her Head and Eyes Closed

 

Most employers believe the workplace is no place to nap, but research increasingly shows that a short nap in the middle of the day carries many benefits in increased productivity.

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16-05 Segment 1: Silent Heart Attack

 

Synopsis: Heart attacks that produce few if any symptoms may be mistaken for indigestion or simple malaise, but they can be more serious than heart attacks that bring crushing pain because they often don’t bring a victim to the hospital for lifesaving help. Experts discuss.

Host: Reed Pence. Guests: Dr. Martha Gulati, cardiologist, Universisty of Arizona and Editor-in-Chief, American College of Cardiology patient education initiative, Cardiosmart. org; Dr. Robert Vogel, Professor of Medicine and Cardiology, University of Colorado and co-author, The Pritikin Edge.

Links for more information:

Stay in the loop! Follow us on Twitter and like us on Facebook!

Click here for the transcript